Bright Star (2009)

[Happy birthday, Andy! Not that you read this, but maybe someone’ll tell you about it. Love, Your Sister.]

One of my study group members (I’m in law school) was, er, less than enthralled with whatever it was we were supposed to be doing so took a moment out to look up the upcoming movies for this week. One of them was described as ‘hot Regency chastity,’ I think by the New York Times, and was clearly a costume drama, so we made plans to see it as soon as possible. Directed by Jane Campion, it starts Abbie Cornish as Fanny Brawne and Ben Whishaw as the poet John Keats.

Fanny is young — late teens or early twenties — and rather more interested in fashion than poetry when she makes the acquaintance of John Keats and his friend and collaborator, Mr. (Charles Armitage) Brown. The two come into closer acquaintance and then fall in love, despite the fact that Keats has less than no money and Fanny, whose father is dead, cannot marry him. Nonetheless, they enter into an affair of the heart, and although the world — and Keats’s health — conspire to keep them apart, they find ways to remain together. Continue reading Bright Star (2009)

Star Trek (2009)

Confession time: I am a Trekkie. When I was a kid, Star Trek: The Next Generation (ST:TNG) was still being aired live, and my parents were not only fans, but felt that it was good, clean family entertainment. (Close enough.) I’ve seen enough episodes of Star Trek: The Original Series (ST:TOS) to know what’s going on; I’ve probably seen all of them at one point or another, but it’s been fifteen years on many of them. I don’t, however, have the sentimental attachment to ST:TOS that I do to ST:TNG, and that’s obviously coloring my observations on the movie — which, by the way, was directed by J. J. Abrams of Alias and Lost fame, and starred Zachary Quinto (of Heroes infamy) as Spock, Zoe Saldana as Uhura, and Chris Pine as James T. Kirk. (Also Leonard Nimoy [Spock, also] and Bruce Greenwood [Capt. Pike], with appearances by Winona Ryder [Amanda], John Cho [Sulu], Simon Pegg [Scotty], Anton Yelchin [Chekhov], Karl Urban [McCoy], and Eric Bana [Nero].)

In the beginning, there was a brave young first officer named Kirk — George Kirk, thank you very much — who realized that he was in a no-win situation, and ordered the entire ship evacuated, including his wife who was pretty much in the process of giving birth at the time. Fast forward to twelve years later, and we see the baby — James Tiberius Kirk, after his grandfathers — has already started a life of rebellion and general James Deanishness. Eight or ten years later, after a bar fight, a Starfleet officer named Pike convinces the young Jim Kirk to join the academy. Three years later, while there, Kirk is on the verge of getting thrown out when a situation requires a good deal of the cadets to be used on ships, and via subterfuge, he gets onto the USS Enterprise (NCC-1701). Will they survive this situation? Continue reading Star Trek (2009)

Blood Ties, the complete series (TV show)

Once upon a time, troche back in the mid-90s, this site a significantly-younger Stephanie was prowling the library for an author she’d heard about in the back of another book she liked very much. She found the fantasy novels by said author; the first one was called Sing the Four Quarters, which piqued Stephanie’s interest as she was a piano student. After devouring them, she went after other books by the same author (Tanya Huff), and discovered one of her favorite series ever: the Vicki “Victory” Nelson books. She read them so many times that she nearly had them memorized, and when, several years later, she found out that a Canadian station was making them into a TV series, she was simultaneously elated and dismayed. What if they weren’t quite right?

Well, I put off watching them until the series was over (but I did DVR them, for ratings purposes), but I finally succumbed last week, and absorbed all 23 episodes over a very short period of time. Our basic plot, shared between the books and the show, is that Vicki Nelson had to leave the police force, due to failing vision, and she started her own private-investigation career. One of her cases turned out to be . . . weird, and not only did it throw her back into contact with her ex-partner on the force (and ex-lover) Mike Celluci, but it also had her meeting a vampire, Henry Fitzroy (bastard son of Henry VIII), and encountering a demon. Well, now the ‘otherworldly crimes’ are a specialty . . . Continue reading Blood Ties, the complete series (TV show)

Dollhouse, Season 1, Episode 1, created by Joss Whedon

[So, tadalafil a TV review. There will be more in the future, more about but not every day. Enjoy!]

I love Firefly. I haven’t watched any Buffy (or its spinoff) to date, approved for various reasons (mostly an irrational dislike of Sarah Michelle Gellar), but I’ve seen Firefly and I thought it was an awesome show. Joss Whedon is the creator of both of those series, plus the movie Serenity (based on the first episode of Firefly) and a new series that started last Friday on FOX entitled Dollhouse. Some think he’s a genius; whether he is or not, the general hallmarks of his writing (as far as I can tell) are great one-liners, humor, weird random things happening, and hypothetically strong female characters. The show is available at the moment on Hulu.com, and I’m sure there will be reruns in the future.

Dollhouse starts with an older woman trying to give a younger woman all the information she needs before she signs a release form. We’re informed that it has to do with wiping away one’s entire personality, and I doubt there are very many people going into the show who didn’t read the press releases that have been coming for a year now. The base idea is that there is a group of scientists who have discovered how to erase personalities in women and implant them with new ones, either from a single person or a conglomerate. These women are used hired by men with insane amounts of money for nearly everything: assassins, secret agents, and whores. Continue reading Dollhouse, Season 1, Episode 1, created by Joss Whedon