The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 1), by Rick Riordan

I had avoided this book for a while, order because I didn’t really like the packaging. I also didn’t think I’d be that interested in it. It took a while, but enough people on the internet told me that they were actually kind of fun that I bought book 1. Not surprisingly, I now have no idea why I refused to read it to assiduously. I mean, it ain’t great literature, but it’s certainly a lot of fun.

Perseus (Percy) Jackson is in sixth grade at a boarding school for ‘special’ students; aside from the fact that he’s been diagnosed with dyslexia and ADHD, he’s been kicked out of several boarding schools prior to this one. On a field trip, one of his teachers goes crazy and attacks him. He fends her off with a pen that turns into a sword, given to him by his Latin teacher. After that, no one remembers that this teacher ever existed, and Percy wonders if he’s gone crazy. Not hardly likely — after a few days at the seashore during summer break with his mother, he is attacked again, and finally finds safety at Camp Half-Blood — a camp for heroes. That is — heroes in the Greek sense; ones with a parent who is a god. Percy is one of these heroes. His overall problem, however, is that for some reason, Zeus (yes, THAT Zeus) thinks that Percy has stolen his lightning bolt (yes, THAT lightning bolt). So, guess what Percy gets to do. Continue reading The Lightning Thief (Percy Jackson and the Olympians, Book 1), by Rick Riordan